Tetrepetete

A lightweight and portable game with blocks. Not to be confused with a game of a totally different name. The first game to introduce the innovative free-to-grey concept, offering a free grayscale version of the game. Also, it's kind of fun to play, yet small as a download.

2014-07-22: Tetrepetete 1.1.5 for Android

The Android build has been updated, fixing some rendering issues with the rabbit head lighting and other minor fixes.

2014-07-22: Tetrepetete 1.1.4 for Firefox OS

Tetrepetete has now been approved for Firefox OS, and is available in Firefox Marketplace for download - now including touch input fixes.

2014-04-06: Tetrepetete 1.1.3 for Sailfish OS

This is a minor update that fixes lifecycle management: When focus is lost, the game will be paused.

2014-01-03: Version 1.1.0, Firefox OS, WebGL and Sailfish OS builds

An updated version (version 1.1.0) of Tetrepetete is now available, with updated color builds for Android, Nokia N9 and new builds for Sailfish OS and Firefox OS (updated to 1.1.1 with fixed WebGL rendering). A WebGL version (also updated to 1.1.1) is also available for play now.

Get it now

Play online

The WebGL build of Tetrepetete can be played directly in your browser, if it supports WebGL content properly (tested with Firefox 26): Play Tetrepetete in your browser

Screenshots

Gameplay Video (on Firefox OS)

Old versions: 1.0.0 Free-to-grey release

These releases are here mostly for historic purposes now, grab the full free version of the game from the download links above:

Background

The point of this game is not so much to write yet another clone of that game with blocks of 4, but more about an experiment in creating a portable game using C++ (and no frameworks!) that can be run on multiple platforms and also use multiple rendering backends (OpenGL ES, but also ncurses-based console backend as well as a HTML5 Frontend using server-sent events, XMLHttpRequest and Canvas 2D as well as a WebGL port using Emscripten).

Other experimental things included, but maybe not obvious are: Gameplay recording and playback (you can replay your last game), highscores that can be updated automatically when the game rules change, the use of no images for the GL ES backend (everything is rendered from 3D meshes, or generated font textures) and a cameo appearance of That Rabbit from That Rabbit Game.

Thomas Perl · 2013-04-06